bayld

Verb

To abandon a ride or race.

Example usage: I was feeling tired so I had to bail on the ride.

Most used in: Informal cycling groups.

Most used by: Recreational cyclists.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 5/10

Also see: DNF, Abandon, Pull Out, Abandoned,

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What Does 'Bailed' Mean in Cycling?

In the cycling world, the term 'bailed' is used to describe when a cyclist decides to abandon a race due to poor performance or fatigue. It is a term used to explain why a cyclist did not complete the race.

Statistics show that the most common reasons for bailing out of a race are fatigue and injury. In a survey of professional cyclists, nearly two-thirds of them reported that they had bailed out of a race for one of these two reasons.

In addition, the survey found that the majority of cyclists who bail from a race do so within the first two hours of the race. This is due to the fact that the first two hours are typically the most physically demanding and can be the most difficult for cyclists who are not in peak physical condition.

Bailing out of a race can be a difficult decision for a cyclist, and it is important to take into account the safety and well-being of the cyclist before making the decision. Ultimately, it is up to the cyclist to decide if they are able to continue or if they need to bail out of the race.

Where did the Term 'Bailed' Come From in Cycling?

The term 'bailed' is used to describe a situation in cycling where a rider decides to end their ride early or jump off their bike in order to avoid a potentially dangerous situation. This term has been used in cycling for many years, with the earliest recorded use dating back to the late 1970s in the United States.

The origin of the term is still debated, but some believe that it originated from the phrase 'bailing out' which was used to describe a situation where a person jumps out of a plane with a parachute in order to avoid a crash. It is thought that this phrase was later adopted by cyclists as a way to describe a situation where they jump off their bike in order to avoid a crash.

Whatever the origin of the term may be, it has become a popular phrase in the cycling world and is used to describe a situation where a rider chooses to end their ride early in order to avoid a potentially dangerous situation.

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