Gear Ratio Gear

Gear Ratio Gear

Gir Rah-shee-oh Gir

noun, phrase

Gear ratio is the ratio of the number of teeth on the front chainring and rear cassette.

Example usage: My bike has a gear ratio of 2.5.

Most used in: Cycling communities around the world.

Most used by: Cyclists who are interested in optimizing their ride.

Popularity: 8

Comedy Value: 2

Also see: Cog Set, Chainring, Drivetrain, Gear Ratio,

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What is Gear Ratio Gear?

Gear Ratio Gear, or GRG for short, is a term used to describe the ratio between the number of teeth on a chainring and the number of teeth on a rear cassette cog. It is one of the most important components of a bicycle, as it determines the amount of power being transmitted from the pedals to the wheels. As the gear ratio increases, the bicycle moves faster, but requires more effort to pedal.

There are several different types of GRG, and the most common is the standard 1:1 ratio. This means that for every tooth on the chainring, there is one tooth on the cassette cog. This is the most basic type of ratio, and is the best choice for beginner cyclists. Other common ratios are 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4, which provide more power and speed, but require more effort to pedal.

In addition to the type of ratio, the number of teeth can also vary. Generally, the more teeth on the chainring, the more power and speed the bicycle is capable of producing. However, the more teeth on the chainring, the more difficult it is to pedal. It is important to find the right balance between power and comfort when selecting a GRG.

In summary, Gear Ratio Gear is an important component of any bicycle, as it determines the amount of power and speed that can be produced. The most common ratio is 1:1, but other ratios such as 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4 are also available. The number of teeth on the chainring can also vary, and it is important to find the right balance between power and comfort when selecting a GRG.

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The Origin of the Cycling Term 'Gear Ratio Gear'

The term 'Gear Ratio Gear' (GRG) is a cycling term used to describe the ratio of a bike's gears. It was first used in the early 1900s in France and the United Kingdom. The concept was developed to help cyclists better understand the gearing of their bike and how the gears interact with each other.

The term 'Gear Ratio Gear' was first used in a French magazine in 1904 by a cycling enthusiast named Jean-Marie Mélac. He used the term to describe the ratio between the front and rear sprockets of a bicycle. This ratio was used to determine the speed and efficiency of a cyclist's pedaling.

In the United Kingdom, the term was adopted by the cycling community in the 1920s. Cyclists began using the term to measure the performance of their bikes and to determine which gear combinations would give them the most speed and power. Over time, the term became a standard part of the cycling lexicon.

Today, the term 'Gear Ratio Gear' is still used by cyclists all over the world. It is used to describe the ratio between the front and rear sprockets of a bike and to measure the performance of a cyclist's pedaling. This term has become an essential part of the cycling culture and has been used for over a century.

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