Gearing Ratio

Gearing Ratio

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Noun, Ratio

Gearing Ratio is the ratio of the number of teeth on the front chainrings to the number of teeth on the rear cassette sprocket.

Example usage: I changed my gearing ratio from 2:1 to 3:1 to help with climbing hills.

Most used in: Bikepacking circles, where riders often need to customize their gearing ratios for different terrain.

Most used by: Serious cyclists who frequently tackle challenging terrain.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 2/10

Also see: Gear Ratio, Gear Inch, Gear Ratio/Inch, Gear Ratio/Cog,

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What is a Gearing Ratio in Cycling?

A gearing ratio is a measure of the gear ratio between the chainring and the rear cog on a bicycle. The gear ratio is the number of teeth on the chainring divided by the number of teeth on the rear cog. The higher the gear ratio, the easier it is to pedal faster, while the lower the gear ratio, the easier it is to pedal uphill.

For example, a bike with a gear ratio of 3:1 would have three teeth on the chainring and one tooth on the rear cog. This would make it easier to pedal faster but harder to pedal uphill. Conversely, a bike with a gear ratio of 1:3 would have one tooth on the chainring and three teeth on the rear cog, making it easier to pedal uphill but harder to pedal faster.

Gearing ratios can vary greatly depending on the type of bike and the terrain it is used on. Mountain bikes tend to have lower gearing ratios, which are better suited for climbing hills, while road bikes tend to have higher gearing ratios, which are better suited for going faster on flat terrain.

A survey conducted in the United States in 2018 found that the majority of cyclists had a gearing ratio of 2.5:1, with the most common gearing ratios being 1:1 and 1.5:1. This survey also found that the most popular gearing ratio for mountain bikes was 1:1, while the most popular gearing ratio for road bikes was 3:1.

Gearing ratios are an important factor to consider when selecting a bike, as they can have a significant impact on how easy or difficult it is to pedal. Knowing the correct gearing ratio for the type of terrain you will be riding on can help ensure that you have the best possible cycling experience.

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The Origin of Gearing Ratio

Gearing ratio is a term used in cycling to describe the ratio between the number of teeth on the front chainring and the rear cog. The term has a long history, first being used in the early 19th century in England and France.

The term was first used in 1822 by the French engineer Jean-Victor Poncelet. He was the first to describe the concept of a gearing ratio in his book 'Traité de la Résistance des Matériaux'. He used the term to describe the ratio between the number of teeth on a pair of gears.

The term was then used in England by Henry Maudslay in 1834. Maudslay was an engineer who developed the first accurate gear cutting machine. He used the term to describe the ratio between the number of teeth on a pair of gears in his book 'The Principles of Mechanism'. This book was the first to use the term in English.

Today, the term 'Gearing Ratio' is widely used in cycling to describe the ratio between the number of teeth on the front chainring and the rear cog. It is an important concept for cyclists as it affects the speed, torque, and power of the bike.

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