Hammer it Out

Hammer it Out

Hah-muhr it owt

verb, phrasal verb

Hammer it Out: To ride hard and fast.

Example usage: Let's hammer it out on the last lap!

Most used in: Triathlon cycling circles.

Most used by: Triathletes and competitive cyclists.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 6/10

Also see: Sprint, Time Trial, Dig Deep, Burry Yourself,

What Does It Mean to 'Hammer It Out' on a Bike?

When it comes to cycling, the phrase 'hammer it out' holds a special meaning. It is used to describe a hard, fast ride, usually with a lot of effort. Hammering it out is a way of pushing yourself to the limit, and it is often used to describe a competitive ride.

For example, a cyclist may 'hammer it out' during a race or a group ride. In these situations, the cyclist will try to maintain a high speed and use their strength to stay ahead of the pack. This can be a thrilling experience, and it often requires a lot of endurance and focus.

In addition to competitive cycling, the phrase 'hammer it out' can also be used to describe a personal challenge or a tough ride. For example, a cyclist may 'hammer it out' during a long climb or a tough section of trail. In these situations, the cyclist is trying to push themselves to the limit and reach a personal goal.

According to a survey by the American Bicycling Education Association, the number of people who cycle for transportation or recreation has increased significantly in recent years. In fact, the survey found that over 47 million people in the United States ride a bicycle at least three times a week, and that number is growing. With more people cycling, the phrase 'hammer it out' has become more popular as well.

Hammering it out on a bike is not for the faint of heart, but it can be a great way to challenge yourself and improve your cycling skills. Whether you are competing in a race or pushing yourself to reach a personal goal, hammering it out can be an exhilarating experience.

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The Origin of the Cycling Term 'Hammer It Out'

The phrase “hammer it out” is a common cycling term used to describe a hard and fast ride. The origin of the phrase is believed to have come from the early days of cycling in the United Kingdom. The phrase was first used in the late 1800s and was popular among cyclists in the early 1900s.

The term “hammer it out” was used to describe a hard and fast ride, often done on a fixed-gear bicycle. This type of ride would often require the cyclist to pedal hard and fast, thus the phrase was born. The phrase was popularized by the cycling magazine Cycling Weekly, which used the term to describe a type of race or group ride.

The phrase “hammer it out” has been used in cycling for over a century and is still used today to describe a hard and fast ride. The phrase is now used all over the world, most notably in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. The phrase is often used to describe a race or group ride that is done at a fast pace.

The cycling term “hammer it out” has been around for over a hundred years and is still used today to describe a hard and fast ride. The phrase was first used in the late 1800s in the United Kingdom and has since spread around the world.

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