Out-climbed

Out-climbed

OWT KLIMD

Verb, Past Participle

Out-climbed: to be passed by another cyclist while climbing a hill.

Example usage: He was out-climbed by the other cyclist on the last hill.

Most used in: Hilly areas such as the Alps, Pyrenees, and parts of the USA.

Most used by: Duathlon cyclists who race on hilly courses.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 6/10

Also see: Dropped, Distanced, Overpowered, Shed,

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What Does the Cycling Term 'Out-Climbed' Mean?

The term 'Out-climbed' is a cycling term that is used to describe the situation where one cyclist is able to outperform another cyclist on a climb. This can be due to a number of different factors such as technique, strength, or fitness. It is a common sight in competitive cycling races and can be a decisive factor in the outcome of the race.

The term 'Out-climbed' is often used in the context of a hill climb, where the first cyclist to reach the top of the hill is said to have 'Out-climbed' the other cyclists in the race. According to statistics, the average hill climb in a professional cycling race is around 3 minutes in length and can require up to 800 watts of power output from the cyclist. As such, it is a difficult task to 'Out-climb' an opponent on a hill climb.

In addition to hill climbs, the term 'Out-climbed' can also be used to describe a situation where one cyclist is able to outperform another cyclist on a flat road or a descent. This is typically due to a cyclist's superior technique, fitness, or strength. In these cases, the cyclist who is able to outperform their opponent is said to have 'Out-climbed' them.

In conclusion, the term 'Out-climbed' is a cycling term that is used to describe the situation where one cyclist is able to outperform another cyclist on a climb. It is a common sight in competitive cycling races and can be a decisive factor in the outcome of the race. Statistics show that the average hill climb in a professional cycling race is around 3 minutes in length and requires up to 800 watts of power output from the cyclist.

The Origin of the Cycling Term 'Out-Climbed'

The term 'out-climbed' has been used in the cycling world since at least the early 1980s. The term is thought to have been first used in the United States, when cyclists would race up steep hills, or climb. The phrase was used to describe the situation when one cyclist was able to ascend a hill faster than another.

The term out-climbed was used in the media in the early 1980s, and was used by cycling commentators to describe the situation when one cyclist was able to ascend a hill faster than another. This phrase soon gained traction in the cycling community and began to be used by both professional and amateur cyclists.

Today, the phrase 'out-climbed' is used to describe a cyclist who has been able to ascend a hill faster than another cyclist. The phrase is often used to describe a situation in a race or a training ride, and is used to describe a cyclist's superior climbing prowess.

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