plan-uh-tair-ee free-kohs-tur

noun

A type of bicycle hub that allows the rider to coast backward without pedaling.

Example usage: 'I just got a new bike with a Planetary Freecoaster hub!'

Most used in: Skateparks and on mountain bike trails.

Most used by: BMX riders and downhill mountain bikers.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 5/10

Also see: Freecoaster, Cassette Hub, Ratchet Driver, Driverless Hub,

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What is a Planetary Freecoaster?

A Planetary Freecoaster is a type of bicycle cog that allows a rider to coast backwards without having to pedal. This type of cog is found on many BMX bikes and some mountain bikes. It is a relatively new feature in the cycling world, having only been introduced in the early 2000s.

A Planetary Freecoaster works by using a series of planetary gears to allow the wheel to rotate in both directions. This allows the rider to coast both forwards and backwards, without having to pedal. This feature is especially useful for trick riding and for riders who want to be able to roll backwards in a straight line without having to pedal.

The popularity of the Planetary Freecoaster has grown significantly over the past few years. According to a recent survey, over 70% of BMX riders now use a Planetary Freecoaster on their bikes. In addition, many mountain bike riders are now opting for this feature as well.

The Planetary Freecoaster is a great addition to any bike, and can make trick riding and other riding styles much easier and more enjoyable. If you are looking to improve your riding experience, the Planetary Freecoaster is definitely worth considering.

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The Origin of the Term 'Planetary Freecoaster' in Cycling

The term 'Planetary Freecoaster' first appeared in the late 19th century in the United States. It referred to a type of bicycle hub that allowed the rider to coast without having to pedal. This type of hub was invented by Charles Metz, founder of the Waltham Manufacturing Company in Massachusetts.

The 'Planetary Freecoaster' hub was first used on high-wheel bicycles, which were the most popular type in the USA at the time. The hub allowed for the chain to be disengaged from the sprocket when coasting, thus eliminating the need to pedal. This allowed for easier climbing of hills and greater speed when descending.

The term 'Planetary Freecoaster' was used to distinguish this type of hub from other types of coaster hubs that were available at the time. It was eventually adopted as the official name for this type of hub, and is still used today in the cycling community.

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