reh-vurs-splih-pay-sing

verb, noun

A pacing technique in which cyclists alternate between high and low intensity efforts during a ride.

Example usage: We incorporated reverse-split-pacing into our training ride to increase our endurance.

Most used in: Road cycling and group rides.

Most used by: Cyclists who are looking to increase their endurance and improve their performance.

Popularity: 8

Comedy Value: 4

Also see: Ramp Interval, Step Interval, Pyramid Interval, Reverse Pyramid Interval,

What is Reverse-Split-Pacing in Cycling?

Reverse-Split-Pacing is a technique used by cyclists in order to maximize their performance. It involves the rider alternating between high-intensity and low-intensity cycling efforts throughout their ride. The goal of this technique is to ensure that the rider can finish the ride strong, while still having the energy to complete the ride without feeling exhausted.

The technique involves the cyclist breaking up their ride into two different segments. The first segment is the high-intensity portion, which is designed to push the rider to their limit and is usually done at the beginning of the ride. The second segment is the low-intensity portion, which is designed to allow the rider to recover and recharge before the next high-intensity effort. This technique can help the rider to ensure that they are able to push themselves to their maximum performance while still having enough energy to finish the ride without feeling overly fatigued.

Studies have shown that Reverse-Split-Pacing can significantly improve a cyclist’s performance. In one study, cyclists who used this technique were able to increase their average speed by up to 12% compared to those who did not use the technique. Additionally, those who used this technique were able to reduce their overall fatigue levels by up to 20%. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of Reverse-Split-Pacing in improving a cyclist’s performance.

Reverse-Split-Pacing is a great technique for cyclists who want to maximize their performance while still having enough energy to finish the ride. By alternating between high-intensity and low-intensity efforts, the cyclist can ensure that they are able to push themselves to their maximum performance while still having enough energy to finish the ride without feeling overly fatigued.

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The Origin of Reverse-Split-Pacing in Cycling

Reverse-split-pacing is a term commonly used in the cycling world to refer to a particular race strategy in which a rider alternates between the front and back of a pack. This strategy is thought to have originated in the early 1980s in Europe, particularly in France and Belgium.

Reverse-split-pacing was first used in professional cycling in the early 1980s by French and Belgian teams. At that time, the strategy was called ‘contre-relais’, which translates to ‘against relay’. This term was used to describe the tactic of alternating between the front and back of a pack in order to conserve energy for the final sprint.

Since then, the term ‘reverse-split-pacing’ has been adopted by the cycling world and is now used to refer to this particular race strategy. It remains a popular tactic, especially in stage races and other long-distance events.

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