Rotating Paceline

Rotating Paceline

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Noun, Verb

A cycling technique used by triathletes in which cyclists take turns leading the group in a single file formation.

Example usage: 'We will be using the rotating paceline technique for the race tomorrow.'

Most used in: Triathlons and long-distance cycling events.

Most used by: Experienced cyclists and triathletes.

Popularity: 8

Comedy Value: 2

Also see: Rotating Group Ride, Peloton, Echelon, Paceline,

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What is a Rotating Paceline?

A rotating paceline is a formation of cyclists in which each person takes a turn at the front, breaking the wind for the group. This allows for a more efficient ride, with each person taking a turn at the front and then dropping back to the rear of the line to rest. The cyclists at the front of the line will be working the hardest, while those at the rear will be conserving energy.

This technique is popular for group rides, as it allows for a more efficient use of energy. Studies have shown that cycling in a rotating paceline can reduce the energy expenditure of the group by up to 40%. This means that the riders can travel farther and faster with less effort than if they were riding alone.

Rotating pacelines can also be used to improve speed. By taking turns at the front, each cyclist can maintain a higher speed than if they were riding alone. This also allows for more efficient use of energy, as each cyclist can take a turn at the front and then rest while the others take their turn.

Overall, a rotating paceline is an effective way for groups of cyclists to ride more efficiently. By taking turns at the front, the group can travel farther and faster with less effort than if they were riding alone. This technique is popular for group rides and can reduce the energy expenditure of the group by up to 40%.

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Where did the Cycling Term 'Rotating Paceline' Originate?

The cycling term 'rotating paceline' was first used in the United States in the late 1970s. It was used to describe a particular type of group ride where riders take turns leading the group and drafting off each other in a single file line.

The term is believed to have originated from the military, where it was used to describe a formation in which a group of soldiers would march in a single file line, with each soldier taking turns leading the group.

The term quickly spread to cycling circles in the US, and it has since become a commonly used term among cyclists all over the world.

Today, the term 'rotating paceline' is used to describe a wide variety of group rides, from leisurely rides to intense training sessions, and it is an essential part of many cyclists' vocabulary.

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