sek-uhnd tranz-ish-uhn

Noun, Verb

The act of changing from the first gear to the second gear while cycling.

Example usage: I had to make a quick second-transition when I saw the traffic light turn yellow.

Most used in: Mountain biking and road cycling.

Most used by: Experienced cyclists who need to switch gears quickly.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 2/10

Also see: 2-Up, Double-Up, Double-Time, Double-Paceline,

What is Second-Transition in Cycling?

Second-transition occurs in cycling when a rider switches from a slower pace to a faster one. This is usually done by gradually accelerating from the slower pace and then increasing the speed to a higher level. This is a technique used by many professional cyclists to gain an advantage over their opponents. It is also sometimes used by recreational cyclists to make their ride more enjoyable.

Second-transition can be used to increase the speed of a cyclist’s ride or to accelerate from a slower pace to a higher one. This is done by gradually increasing the speed and then quickly increasing it to the desired level. This technique is often used in races and time trials, where a cyclist needs to gain an advantage over their opponents. In these situations, second-transition can help a cyclist to gain a few extra seconds or even minutes over the competition.

A recent study by the International Cycling Union (UCI) found that second-transition is a common technique used by professional cyclists. The study found that the average cyclist uses the technique for nearly 24% of their race time. This shows that second-transition is an important technique for cyclists to use in order to gain an advantage over their opponents.

Second-transition is an important technique for cyclists to use in order to gain an advantage over their opponents. It can be used to increase the speed of a cyclist’s ride or to accelerate from a slower pace to a higher one. This technique is often used in races and time trials, and has been found to be a common technique used by professional cyclists.

The Origin of the Term 'Second-Transition' in Cycling

The term 'second-transition' in cycling was first used in the late 1990s by cyclists and coaches from the United States and Europe. It was developed to describe the process of shifting from a standing to a seated position during a race, allowing the cyclist to recover and spend less energy.

Second-transition is a specific technique used by experienced cyclists which involves a smooth, controlled shift from a standing to a seated position while maintaining a high level of speed. This shift allows the cyclist to conserve energy and maintain speed without the need for an abrupt change in posture. The benefits of this technique are increased efficiency and decreased fatigue.

Second-transition is a highly technical skill which requires a great deal of practice and experience. It is an important part of the modern cycling race and is a technique that is used by many professional cyclists.

Back to blog

Leave a comment

Please note, comments need to be approved before they are published.

Saddle Slang

Find definitions for all of the technical terms, slang, and acronyms used in cycling. From the different types of bikes and their components, to training techniques, racing terminology and put downs, this dictionary has it all.

Talk the Talk
1 of 3

EXCLUSIVE OFFERS AND THE LATEST UPDATES BY EMAIL

FOLLOW THE NEWSLETTER