T1

T1

Tee-one

Noun, Abbreviation

T1 is a transition area between the running and cycling legs of a duathlon.

Example usage: 'I stopped at T1 to switch from my running shoes to my cycling shoes.'

Most used in: Duathlon competitions around the world.

Most used by: Multi-sport athletes who participate in duathlons.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 2/10

Also see: Time Trial, Individual Time Trial, Race of Truth, Chrono,

What is a T1 in Cycling?

In cycling, the term T1 (or Transition 1) is used to describe the period between the end of a swim and the beginning of a bike ride. This transition period is an important part of any triathlon race, as it provides the opportunity to change from swim gear to cycling gear, including a helmet and cycling shoes, and get on the bike.

During a triathlon race, T1 is timed and is part of the overall race time, so it is important to be as efficient as possible to get on the bike and start the cycling leg quickly. Professional triathletes are able to complete T1 in as little as 20-30 seconds.

For amateur triathletes, the average T1 time is around 2 minutes. This can vary greatly depending on the race and the athlete’s ability to quickly transition from swim gear to cycling gear.

T1 is an important part of any triathlon and can have a big impact on the overall race time. Therefore, it is important to practice and become as efficient as possible in order to get on the bike quickly and start the cycling leg of the race.

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The Origin of the Cycling Term 'T1'

The term 'T1' is commonly used in cycling to refer to the transition area between swim and bike, and is short for 'Transition 1'. It was first used in the mid-1980s in the triathlon community in the United States.

The term was popularized in the 1990s during the Ironman Triathlon, which was first held in Hawaii in 1978. During the event, athletes must transition from swimming to cycling, and the transition area was typically referred to as 'T1' or 'Transition 1'.

The term has since been adopted by the cycling community, and is now widely used to refer to the transition area between swim and bike. As cycling has gained popularity, the term has become more widely known and used around the world.

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