Crankarms

Crankarms

krank-ahrms

Noun, Plural

Crankarms are the arms attached to the pedals of a bicycle.

Example usage: I need to adjust the length of my crankarms for a more comfortable ride.

Most used in: Cycling communities around the world.

Most used by: Cyclists of all levels and abilities.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 3/10

Also see: Cranks, Chainrings, Bottom Bracket, Pedals, Spindle,

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What are Crankarms?

Crankarms are the arms that connect the pedals to the bottom bracket of a bicycle. They are a vital component of the drivetrain, as they transfer the power from the rider's legs to the rear wheel. Crankarms come in a variety of sizes, materials, and configurations, allowing cyclists to customize their ride. In general, crankarms range in length from 140mm to 175mm and are available in aluminum, steel, and carbon.

When selecting crankarms, it's important to consider the type of riding you will be doing. For instance, cross-country riders typically prefer shorter crankarms for increased pedaling efficiency, while downhill riders prefer longer crankarms for increased leverage and stability. Additionally, the material of the crankarms should be chosen based on the rider's weight and power output. Lighter riders should opt for aluminum or carbon crankarms, while heavier riders should choose steel crankarms for increased strength and durability.

In recent years, the popularity of crankarms has grown significantly. According to a 2020 survey, over 70% of cyclists purchase aftermarket crankarms to customize their ride. With the wide variety of options available, it's easy to find the perfect crankarm for your needs.

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The History of the Cycling Term “Crankarms”

The cycling term “crankarms” has been around since at least the late 1880s. The first known use of the term was in a German cycling magazine called Radfahrer-Zeitung, which was published in Berlin in 1889. The term was used to describe the arms of the bicycle crank, which is the part that connects the pedals to the sprocket.

By the early 1900s, the term was used widely in the cycling community. In the United States, the term was used in many cycling magazines, such as the American Wheelman, which was published in Boston in 1901. The term was also used in the UK, where it was featured in Cycling, a magazine published in London in 1905.

Today, the term is used in many different cycling contexts, from mountain biking to road cycling. It is used to describe the arms of the bicycle crank, which are the components that attach the pedals to the sprocket.

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