Drop the Hammer

Drop the Hammer

Drahp thuh ham-er

Verb, Noun

Drop the Hammer: To give a sudden burst of speed in a race.

Example usage: He was ahead of the pack until I dropped the hammer and pulled ahead.

Most used in: Triathlon races and other endurance competitions.

Most used by: Triathletes and other endurance athletes.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 5/10

Also see: Sprint, Kick, Bridge the Gap, Hammer it Out,

What Does “Drop the Hammer” Mean in Cycling?

“Drop the hammer” is a phrase that is used in the cycling world to describe an intense burst of speed. It’s often used to describe the act of sprinting at the end of a race or a hard climb. When a cyclist “drops the hammer”, they are giving it their all and pushing themselves to the limit.

The phrase “drop the hammer” originated in the United States and was used by professional cyclists in the early 1900s. It was used to describe the act of pushing yourself to the limit and giving it your all in a race or a hard climb. The phrase has since become popular in the cycling world, with many cyclists using the phrase to describe their own sprints or climbs.

Statistics show that the average cyclist can reach speeds of up to 40km/h in a sprint. Professional cyclists can reach speeds of up to 70km/h. These speeds require a huge amount of energy and effort, and are often referred to as “dropping the hammer”.

In short, “drop the hammer” is a phrase used in the cycling world to describe an intense burst of speed. It’s often used to describe the act of sprinting at the end of a race or a hard climb, and can require a huge amount of energy and effort. Statistics show that the average cyclist can reach speeds of up to 40km/h in a sprint, while professional cyclists can reach speeds of up to 70km/h.

The Origin of the Cycling Term 'Drop the Hammer'

The phrase 'drop the hammer' is used in the cycling world to refer to a cyclist pushing themselves to their physical limits and giving it their all. The phrase originated in the United States in the early 2000s, and has since become a common phrase used among cyclists.

The origin of the phrase is not entirely clear, but it is believed to have originated from the mountain biking community. It is thought to have been used first by mountain bikers in the Santa Cruz, California area, and then spread to other cyclists around the country.

The phrase is used to describe a cyclist pushing themselves to their limits, and it is often used as an expression of encouragement for other cyclists. It can also be used to describe a cyclist giving it their all in a race or competition.

Today, the phrase is used by cyclists all around the world, and it has become a popular way to express enthusiasm and support for fellow cyclists. Whether you are a professional racer or a recreational cyclist, dropping the hammer is a way to show that you are pushing yourself to your physical limits.

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