Flyby

Flyby

Fahy-bai

noun, verb

Flyby is a term used to describe when a cyclist passes a fellow cyclist while racing.

Example usage: 'He flew by me on the last lap of the race.'

Most used in: Duathlon cycling events around the world.

Most used by: Competitive cyclists racing in duathlons.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 5/10

Also see: Drafting, Slipstreaming, Wheel Sucking, Tucking,

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What Is the Cycling Term 'Flyby'?

The cycling term 'flyby' is used to describe a situation when a cyclist passes another cyclist in a race or other competitive event. This term is generally used when the cyclist passes another cyclist with a significant speed advantage. A good example of a flyby would be when a cyclist passes another cyclist in a sprint.

Flyby is often used in competitive cycling races to describe when a cyclist passes another cyclist with a significant speed advantage. This is usually done by quickly accelerating past the other cyclist. The cyclist who is passed is referred to as the 'victim' of the flyby.

Flybys are often seen in professional cycling races such as the Tour de France. Studies have shown that flybys are a common occurrence in these races, with an average of one flyby every 5 kilometers. Flybys are also used in other cycling events such as time trials, hill climbs, and criteriums.

Flybys are a great way to gain an advantage in a cycling race. It can be used to quickly overtake another cyclist and gain a significant amount of time. However, it is important to remember that flybys should only be used in a safe manner and should not be used to endanger other cyclists.

The Origin of the Cycling Term 'Flyby'

The term 'Flyby' has become a common slang used by cyclists to describe a situation in which a cyclist passes another cyclist in a race or group ride. The term was first used in the late 1990s, in the cycling communities of the San Francisco Bay Area in California.

The origin of the term is believed to have been derived from the military term 'flyby', which is used to describe an aircraft passing another aircraft. This term was then adopted by cyclists who, during group rides or races, would pass other cyclists in a similar manner to the way a plane would pass another plane.

The term has since become popular in the cycling world and is now widely used to describe a situation in which a cyclist passes another cyclist. It is a term that is used both in casual and competitive cycling, and is now widely used in the cycling world.

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