Gearing

Gearing

Gee-uh-ring

Noun, Verb

Gearing refers to the ratio of teeth on the front chainring to the rear sprocket.

Example usage: I switched my gearing to a higher ratio so I can go faster on the flats.

Most used in: Cycling communities in Europe, North America and Australia.

Most used by: Cyclists who are more experienced and knowledgeable about bike mechanics.

Popularity: 8

Comedy Value: 3

Also see: Cadence, Gear Ratio, Gear Inches, Gear Ratio Gear,

What is Gearing in Cycling?

Gearing in cycling is the ratio of the number of teeth between the front chainring and the rear cog. It is an important factor in determining how much effort is required to pedal at a given speed. The higher the gear, the more effort is required to turn the wheel. The lower the gear, the less effort is required.

The gear ratio is determined by the number of teeth on the front chainring and the number of teeth on the rear cog. For example, if a cyclist has a chainring with 20 teeth and a rear cog with 40 teeth, then the gear ratio is 2:1. This means that for every one turn of the front chainring, the rear wheel will turn two times.

The gear ratio can be used to calculate the speed of a cyclist. If a cyclist is pedaling at 60 revolutions per minute, then the speed of the bike can be calculated by multiplying the gear ratio by 60. In this example, the speed of the bike will be 120 RPM.

Gearing is an important factor in cycling performance. A cyclist can use different gear ratios to adjust their speed and effort depending on the terrain they are riding on. Cyclists can also use gearing to increase their speed on flat terrain or to climb hills more easily.

In the United States, the average gear ratio for a road bike is 1.4:1. For mountain bikes, the average gear ratio is 2.3:1. The average gear ratio for a hybrid bike is 1.9:1.

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The History of Cycling's Term 'Gearing'

The term 'gearing' has been used in cycling since the early 20th century. It was first used in the United Kingdom in 1911, when an article in The Times newspaper referred to the 'gearing' of a bicycle. It was also used in the United States in the same period, as evidenced by a 1914 advertisement for a bicycle chain manufacturer in the American magazine, The Bicycle World and Motorcycle Review.

The term has since become a common part of cycling language, used to refer to the ratio between the number of teeth on the chain-rings and the rear cogs. This ratio determines the speed and power output of the cyclist, and is a key factor in choosing the right bicycle for the rider.

Today, the term 'gearing' is used widely in the world of cycling, and is used to refer to the ratio between the number of teeth on the chain-rings and the rear cogs. It is a key factor in choosing the right bicycle for the rider, as it determines the speed and power output of the cyclist.

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