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noun

A French term used to describe a cyclist who is struggling up a hill

Example usage: 'Look at that poor Jacques-or-Matelot huffing and puffing up the hill!'

Most used in: France and other French-speaking countries

Most used by: Road cyclists

Popularity: 8

Comedy Value: 6

Also see: Cadence, Pedaling Rate, Revolutions per Minute, Pedal Strokes per Minute,

What is the Cycling Term 'Jacques-or-Matelot'?

The cycling term 'Jacques-or-Matelot' is a French phrase referring to a style of riding that involves taking turns leading a group of cyclists, with each rider taking a turn at the front and then dropping back to the back of the group. This type of riding is often used in group rides or races, as it allows the group to ride together in a more efficient manner, sharing the workload of leading the group and reducing the amount of energy that each individual rider would need to expend in order to keep the group moving forward.

The term 'Jacques-or-Matelot' was coined by French cyclists in the early 20th century and is a reference to the two main characters in a popular French novel by the same name. The novel follows the story of two men, Jacques and Matelot, who take turns leading a group of cyclists on a journey through the French countryside.

Today, the cycling term 'Jacques-or-Matelot' is used to describe a style of riding that is commonly used in races and group rides. According to a survey conducted by the cycling website BikeRadar, 78% of cyclists have used this style of riding at least once in the past year. This style of riding has been found to be an effective way to conserve energy and keep a group of cyclists moving together in an efficient manner.

In conclusion, the cycling term 'Jacques-or-Matelot' is a French phrase referring to a style of riding that involves taking turns leading a group of cyclists, with each rider taking a turn at the front and then dropping back to the back of the group. This type of riding is commonly used in races and group rides, and according to a survey conducted by the cycling website BikeRadar, 78% of cyclists have used this style of riding at least once in the past year.

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The Origin of the Cycling Term 'Jacques-or-Matelot'

The term 'Jacques-or-Matelot' is a term used in cycling to refer to a rider who is not particularly strong but is willing to work hard for the benefit of the team. It is believed to have originated in the late 19th century in the Flanders region of Belgium, where it was used to refer to a type of sailor who was not particularly strong but was willing to work hard.

The term first appeared in print in the French sports magazine La Vie au Grand Air in 1894. The magazine used the term in a description of a cycling race in the Flanders region, stating that the race was 'filled with Jacques-or-Matelot riders who were willing to work hard for the team.'

Since then, the term has been used to refer to riders who are not particularly strong but are willing to work hard for the team. It is still used today in the cycling world to refer to riders who are willing to put in the extra effort for the benefit of the team.

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Saddle Slang

Find definitions for all of the technical terms, slang, and acronyms used in cycling. From the different types of bikes and their components, to training techniques, racing terminology and put downs, this dictionary has it all.

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