ray-ding-thuh-slip-streem

verb, noun

Riding the slipstream is the act of cycling behind another cyclist to reduce the wind resistance.

Example usage: 'Let's ride the slipstream to get to the finish line faster.'

Most used in: Cycling competitions, particularly those that involve time-trials.

Most used by: Competitive cyclists who are looking to save energy and time.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 5/10

Also see: Drafting, Slipstreaming, Tucking, Wheel-sucking,

.

What is Riding the Slipstream in Cycling?

Riding the slipstream is a cycling term used to describe the act of riding close behind another cyclist to reduce aerodynamic drag. This technique has been used in professional cycling for decades, and is considered a key skill for any competitive cyclist.

The concept of riding the slipstream is based on the idea that the rider behind another cyclist experiences less air resistance, or drag, than the cyclist in front. This is because the cyclist in front is creating a vacuum or “slipstream” of air that the cyclist behind can take advantage of. This slipstream effect can reduce the amount of energy required to maintain a given speed, which is especially important in races that involve long distances or steep inclines.

Studies have shown that the slipstream effect can reduce aerodynamic drag by as much as 40 percent. This can be a huge advantage in competitive cycling, as it can help riders conserve energy, maintain a higher average speed, and ultimately improve their performance.

Riding the slipstream is a skill that takes practice to master. It requires a cyclist to stay close behind another rider without colliding or veering off course. Professional cyclists often practice riding the slipstream in groups to prepare for competitions.

In summary, riding the slipstream is a technique used by cyclists to reduce aerodynamic drag and improve their performance. Studies have shown that it can reduce drag by up to 40 percent, making it a key skill for any competitive cyclist.

.

Tracing the Origin of 'Riding the Slipstream' in Cycling

The term 'riding the slipstream' in the context of cycling was first used in the early 1920s. The phrase was first used in the United States in the Midwest and Southwest regions. It was popularized by the Tour de France cyclists from France, who used the technique to save energy while riding in a group.

Riding the slipstream is a technique used by cyclists to save energy while riding in a group. It involves positioning oneself in the slipstream of a lead cyclist, which is the area of reduced air resistance behind them. This allows the trailing cyclist to conserve energy while still maintaining the same speed as the lead cyclist.

Riding the slipstream was first described in the Tour de France in the early 1920s. It was a common technique used by the French cyclists to conserve energy while still maintaining a high speed. The technique was later adopted by American cyclists in the Midwest and Southwest regions, and the phrase 'riding the slipstream' was first used to describe the technique.

Today, the phrase 'riding the slipstream' is a widely used term in cycling. It is used to describe the technique of riding in a group behind a lead cyclist to conserve energy while still maintaining the same speed. The phrase has become so popular that it has now been adopted by other sports such as motor racing and sailing.

Back to blog

Leave a comment

Please note, comments need to be approved before they are published.

Saddle Slang

Find definitions for all of the technical terms, slang, and acronyms used in cycling. From the different types of bikes and their components, to training techniques, racing terminology and put downs, this dictionary has it all.

Talk the Talk
1 of 3

EXCLUSIVE OFFERS AND THE LATEST UPDATES BY EMAIL

FOLLOW THE NEWSLETTER