Climbing Out Of The Saddle

Climbing Out Of The Saddle

klah-ming owt uhv thuh sa-duhl

Verb, Noun

Standing up out of the saddle while cycling

Example usage: I like to stand up and climb out of the saddle on steep hills.

Most used in: Mountain biking and road cycling.

Most used by: Experienced cyclists who are used to tackling hills and inclines.

Popularity: 8

Comedy Value: 5

Also see: Standing Pedal Stroke, Out of the Saddle, Hammering, Standing Climb,

.

What Does It Mean to 'Climb Out Of The Saddle' in Cycling?

Climbing out of the saddle is a term used in cycling to describe the technique of standing up on the pedals while cycling to improve power output. This technique is often used when going uphill or when attempting to increase speed on flat terrain. It requires the rider to lift their body weight off the saddle and move the legs in circles while standing up on the pedals.

Climbing out of the saddle is a popular technique used by professional cyclists. Statistics from the 2018 Tour de France showed that riders averaged around 8.5 seconds of climbing out of the saddle for every 10 minutes of racing, with some riders reaching up to 15 seconds. This technique is typically used when the terrain is too steep to remain seated while pedaling.

Climbing out of the saddle is a useful technique for cyclists of all levels. It helps to build strength and endurance and can also help to increase speed. It is important to practice the technique correctly to ensure safety and to avoid any injuries. The rider should always maintain good posture and focus on pedaling circles with the legs while standing up on the pedals.

.

The Origin of the Term 'Climbing Out of the Saddle' in Cycling

The term 'Climbing Out of the Saddle' (COOTS) is used to describe a cycling technique where the rider stands up from the saddle and pedals with their legs while leaning forward on the handlebars. This technique is used to increase speed and power when climbing hills or other inclines. It was first used by professional cyclists in Europe in the late 19th century, and has since become a common technique used by recreational cyclists as well.

COOTS is a useful technique for experienced cyclists who want to maximize their speed and power on a climb. It allows the rider to use their body weight to push down on the pedals, generating more power than if they were seated in the saddle. This technique also allows the rider to use their upper body strength to help pull on the handlebars, giving them more control over their bike.

COOTS is a popular technique among recreational cyclists, as it allows them to more easily ascend steep inclines. It is also used by competitive cyclists, who use it to gain an edge on their opponents. In recent years, COOTS has become a widely accepted technique in cycling, with many professional riders utilizing it to gain a competitive advantage.

The term 'Climbing Out of the Saddle' has been used in cycling since the late 19th century, and is now a common technique used by cyclists of all levels. It is a useful technique for experienced cyclists who want to maximize their speed and power on a climb, and is popular among recreational cyclists as well.

Back to blog

Leave a comment

Please note, comments need to be approved before they are published.

Saddle Slang

Find definitions for all of the technical terms, slang, and acronyms used in cycling. From the different types of bikes and their components, to training techniques, racing terminology and put downs, this dictionary has it all.

Talk the Talk

EXCLUSIVE OFFERS AND THE LATEST UPDATES BY EMAIL

FOLLOW THE NEWSLETTER