Intervals

Intervals

IN-tuh-vuhlz

Noun, Verb

Intervals are short, intense bursts of cycling interspersed with recovery periods.

Example usage: I'm doing intervals today to improve my leg strength.

Most used in: Cycling communities around the world.

Most used by: Cyclists who are trying to improve their fitness and performance.

Popularity: 8/10

Comedy Value: 4/10

Also see: Sprints, Tabatas, VO2 Max, Tempo, Hill Reps, Threshold Training, Anaerobic Intervals, Fartlek,

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What Are Cycling Intervals?

Cycling intervals are a type of training that involve a series of short, intense bursts of activity, followed by periods of rest. The purpose of cycling intervals is to improve a cyclist’s anaerobic capacity, muscular power, and overall endurance. The intensity of the intervals depends on the cyclist’s fitness level and goals.

Interval training typically involves performing a high-intensity exercise for a short duration, such as 30 seconds to two minutes, followed by a period of rest. This process is typically repeated for a certain amount of time, such as four to eight intervals in one session. As the cyclist’s fitness level improves, the intervals can be increased in intensity and duration.

Studies have shown that interval training has numerous benefits for cyclists. Interval training can help cyclists improve their power output, maximal heart rate, and lactate threshold. Additionally, it can help cyclists burn more fat and calories while improving their overall aerobic capacity.

Interval training is an effective way for cyclists to improve their performance and reach their fitness goals. However, it is important to start slow and gradually increase the intensity and duration of the intervals. This will help ensure that cyclists do not overtrain or injure themselves.

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The Origin of the Cycling Term 'Intervals'

The term 'interval' has been used in cycling since the late 19th century. It was first used in England and referred to a specific type of training exercise for cyclists. These exercises included short, intense bursts of speed followed by a period of rest or slower pedaling.

The idea of interval training was first proposed in the 1890s by an English cycling coach named William Stroud. He argued that this type of training was more effective than the traditional methods of long, steady rides. His ideas were quickly adopted by professional cyclists, and the term 'interval' soon spread across the cycling world.

Today, interval training is a popular and effective way for cyclists to improve their performance. It is used by both professional and amateur cyclists and is a key part of many training programs. Interval training is also used in other sports, such as running, swimming, and rowing.

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